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SUSAN JOHNSTON OWEN-JAZZ  /  SITE OWNER/MUSICIAN, WRITER,ARTIST, ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER (RETIRED)

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ILLUSION INGLES Y TRES VISEIS EN ESPANOL

 

Photos meant to trick the eye

 OPTICAL ILLUSIONS- NEW


WHAT DO YOU SEE?

 

  

 

ARTISTS WHO SPECIALIZE IN VISUAL TRICKERY

M. C. Escher, Dalí and Duchamp were old champs at the art of visual manipulation, but modern-day artists are digitally and traditionally creating cognitive illusions that force a double take. Flat surfaces are turned cavernous with colored chalk, simple graphics are laced with hidden images and ordinary photos are turned into surreal landscapes.

There’s a market for visual trickery, a history of it and a delight when Gestalt theories are interrupted, supported and all together set on end. Don’t be frustrated if you don’t see the illusions on first glance, just look twice.

1. Damien Gilley
Portland-based multi-disciplinary artist Damien Gilley creates immense depth on flat surfaces and walls using only colored strips of tape and contact paper. His designs are meticulously measured and calculated considering the unique proportions and dimensions of each space where he constructs his art. The geometry of his work makes flat surfaces appear to have immense depth and space.

M. C. Escher, Dalí and Duchamp were old champs at the art of visual manipulation, but modern-day artists are digitally and traditionally creating cognitive illusions that force a double take. Flat surfaces are turned cavernous with colored chalk, simple graphics are laced with hidden images and ordinary photos are turned into surreal landscapes.

There’s a market for visual trickery, a history of it and a delight when Gestalt theories are interrupted, supported and all together set on end. Don’t be frustrated if you don’t see the illusions on first glance, just look twice.

FOR MORE CLICK THE LINK

http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2013/09/look-twice-10-artists-who-specialize-in-optical-illusion.html

SAMPLES

                                 

               

An optical illusion is always characterized by visually perceived images that, at least in common sense terms, are deceptive or misleading. Therefore, the information gathered by the eye is processed by the brain to give, on the face of it, a percept that does not tally with a physical measurement of the stimulus source. A conventional assumption is that there are physiological illusions that occur naturally and cognitive illusions that can be demonstrated by specific visual tricks that say something more basic about how human perceptual systems work. The human brain constructs a world inside our head based on what it samples from the surrounding environment. However sometimes it tries to organise this information it thinks best while other times it fills in the gaps. This way in which our brain works is the basis of an illusion.






EN ESPANOL



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